Paying Homage to Adventure and Free Play

If you’re in LA, or passing through in the next two days, check out Kelly Barrie’s exhibit at LAXART. His photos sing out a catchy song of freedom and play. If you’re like me and LA isn’t in the cards in the immediate future then enjoy Barrie’s photos right here at PlayGroundology.

Double Toe Rope Netting, 2010
Digital C-print
125 x 92 inches
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

For all photos, click for larger image.

Get ready because they jump off the screen. I’m inspired to climb, run, dangle and skittle down steep inclines. These photos are laughter ringing, play being, adventure believing. I hope you’ll enjoy these images. Even motionless, they are bursting with kinetic energy.


Reclaimed Sewer Pipe, 2010
Digital C-print
74 x 110 inches framed
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

Negative Capability was inspired by Barrie’s memories of the junkyard playgrounds of his youth in England. Thanks to Sharon Mizota at the Los Angeles Times I found out about this exhibition and subsequently contacted Barrie.


Plank Ladder, 2010
Digital C-print
14 x 74 inches framed
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

I have never had the pleasure of playing in an adventure playground. They were unknown in the places I grew up. Everything that I see and read about them though convinces me that I have to make sure my kids will get a chance to experience their wonder.


Heel Spin Pyramid, 2010
Digital C-print
74 x 92 inches framed
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

This is a tunnel to an alternate form of play, to a space that is challenging, to new discoveries.


Reclaimed Sewer Pipe (detail), 2010
Digital C-print
74 x 110 inches framed
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

This is the great escape – freedom to play, imagine, and to be.


Installation view LAXART, 2010
Image courtesy of LAXART and Kelly Barrie

Below is the news release issued by LAXART for the exhibition.

LAXART is pleased to present a new project by Los Angeles-based artist Kelly Barrie. Inspired by the junkyard playground in London where the artist played as a child, Negative Capability is inspired by the 1959 Declaration of the Rights of the Child (which was amended to the Universal Human Civil Rights Declaration of 1948) that states:

“The child shall have full opportunity for play and recreation, which should be directed to the same purposes as education; society and the public authorities shall endeavour to promote the enjoyment of this right.”

Despite its passage in 1959, this Declaration did not become legally binding until 1989. As a result, this particular right that guarantees free self-directed open space play would ultimately find concrete expression between the 1960's-1980’s with the emergence of junkyard playgrounds and other non-authoritarian play spaces such as adventure playgrounds. Today, due to real estate demands and increasing gentrification, the adventure playground has all but vanished in the US, though they remain popular in Europe.

Barrie’s series of leaning photos/drawings recreate the archetypal components of the historic junkyard playgrounds, such as a reclaimed sewer pipe and rope ladder. The framed photographs are installed in such a way that they convey a sense of idle transition–as if they could be picked up and moved to a different corner of the room. The exhibition title, Negative Capability, refers to a literary concept introduced by poet John Keats that is rooted in the idea that a state of idle receptivity is a means for observing the truth. The manner in which Barrie’s photographs and drawings are installed in the gallery reflect the impermanence of the playground’s components, further evoking a sense of idle transition. For the artist, the gestures conveyed in his photographs address the tension of free versus fixed play. In this case, Barrie’s reconstituted adventure playground will allow for the viewer to abandon the constraints of an existing social order; generating a platform to explore and “actively do nothing,” much like a child at play.

Kelly Barrie was born in 1973 in London, England and currently lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. Kelly Barrie received his BFA in 1996 from Hobart College, Geneva, NY, and his MFA in 1997 from the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, CA. He is a 1998 graduate of the Whitney Independent Study Program. Barrie’s photography has been exhibited at the 2008 Biennale of Sydney, Australia and the 2008 California Biennial. He’s had solo shows at Miller Durazo Fine Arts and Angstrom Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. His work has also been presented in numerous group exhibitions in various venues including Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, NY; Queen’s Nails Projects, San Francisco, CA; Artists Space, New York, NY; and the Museo Alejandro Otero, Caracas, Venezuela. He is a recipient of the Durfee Artist Completion Grant.

Many thanks once again to Kelly Barrie for sharing his fine photos with us.

For more on Kelly Barrie check his site and ArtSlant.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s