Rights of the Child Marks 20 Years in UK

This December 16th marks 20 years since the UK ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. In recognition of this anniversary, PlayGroundology wants to share with its readers in the UK and elsewhere an inspirational project from Montreal’s Salamander playground.

Salamander Playground in Mount Royal Park is the first public space in the world where images and text have been used side by side to tell the story of children’s rights. The images by artist Gérard Dansereau temper the seriousness of the message with a breath of lightness, splashes of colour and an invitation to play. Montréal now joins Massongex, Switzerland and Luxembourg as cities with Rights of the Child commemorative paths.

To Be Different – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

To Be Different (text) – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

Article 2 (Non-discrimination): The Convention applies to all children, whatever their race, religion or abilities; whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from. It doesn’t matter where children live, what language they speak, what their parents do, whether they are boys or girls, what their culture is, whether they have a disability or whether they are rich or poor. No child should be treated unfairly on any basis.

To Be Protected – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

To Be Protected (text) – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

Article 19 (Protection from all forms of violence): Children have the right to be protected from being hurt and mistreated, physically or mentally. Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them. In terms of discipline, the Convention does not specify what forms of punishment parents should use. However any form of discipline involving violence is unacceptable. There are ways to discipline children that are effective in helping children learn about family and social expectations for their behaviour – ones that are non-violent, are appropriate to the child’s level of development and take the best interests of the child into consideration. In most countries, laws already define what sorts of punishments are considered excessive or abusive. It is up to each government to review these laws in light of the Convention.

To Play – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

To Play (text) – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

Article 31 (Leisure, play and culture): Children have the right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of cultural, artistic and other recreational activities.

To express oneself – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

Survival and development – Tile Series by G. Dansereau – Montreal, Canada

Article 6 (Survival and development): Children have the right to live. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily.

The tile series tells the story of children’s rights in a visual language that is accessible to younger kids. And then of course there is Salamander Playground itself. If you’re in Montreal, it’s well worth a visit.

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