Bouquets for play reporting in The Guardian

Hi Ashifa,

Hope you’re well today. I want you to know that The Guardian is one of my favourite publications. I’ll be renewing my annual subscription when it comes up in November. Also I am thrilled that the paper has deemed Canada of sufficient interest that we have a Canadian correspondent – you.

As you’ve discovered, we have news and stories galore to share with your readership around the world. Today I just read your piece on the west coast play brouhaha that was posted on the 12th – Canadian neighbourhood declares ‘war on fun’ with ban on outdoor play.

I understand why these stories are hard to resist. They make great copy. Indignant, or incredulous readers (myself included) can tsk, tsk, or titter, titter at decisions that have lost touch with common sense and situations that seem to emanate from some bizarro 5th dimension. As one twitter friend opined about this story – ‘stop the insanity’.

These narratives from the margins surface every now and then in countries around the world. It’s hard to be sympathetic to the protagonists of such ill conceived incursions into kids’ play.  Their actions seem to indicate a certain detachment from reality.

How about the Toronto principal a few years back that banned bringing balls to school… Or, what about those schools that had a no contact policy? Kids were not allowed to touch each other at recess or throughout the day. Put a crimp on a lot of outdoor games!

In Nova Scotia earlier this month, there was public outcry because many new primary students will not be able to play on schoolyard playgrounds when they enter school for the first time in September. Due to a change in government policy kids are entering a year earlier. The fixed playground equipment is rated for ages 5 through 12. During the school day, kids younger than that are persona non grate.

Invariably the arguments put forward purport a safety link of some sort and a desire to reduce risk and danger. More often than not they are a handy excuse to trot out and achieve stated objectives – no road play, no play on equipment that is not age appropriate, no play in undesignated play spaces, etc.

The Artisan Gardens story on Vancouver Island has gone the rounds – Global News, CBC, CTV, Times Colonist, BBC and The Guardian. Each of these stories would have been stronger had there been some mention of play’s changing dynamics in Canada. It would have raised the bar from good copy about a quirky subject to helping create greater awareness of the bigger picture.

Builders and designers, municipal leaders and recreation planners, educators and researchers are coming to similar evidence-based conclusions. Risk and resilience are closely linked and this understanding is helping to lead a renaissance of play.

Today we visited Kentville on Canada’s east coast. There was a festival where roads in the community’s downtown were cordoned off so kids and adults could chalk the streets. This is an example – and there are many more – of some of the great things that are happening in Canadian communities.

Source: Town of Wolfville Facebook Page

It’s encouraging when assignment editors dispatch reporters to get stories on play, or when reporters themselves pitch these stories to their editors. If these ‘gotcha, good copy’ stories could provide just a little more context on some of the exciting developments taking place across the country like Calgary’s itinerant loose parts, Coquitlam’s new adventure playground, the proliferation of natural playgrounds, or the important work being supported by The Lawson Foundation… Well us play people would be jumping for joy.

Oakdene Park, Kentville, Nova Scotia

Ashifa – if you ever make it down our way to Nova Scotia, Canada’s Ocean Playground, give us a shout and we’ll be happy to introduce you to some great play stories.

Speaking of which here are some more fine stories from The Guardian on play.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.