Category Archives: #playrocks

When Good Things Happen

Kids and parents in Nova Scotia, Canada are giving two thumbs up to a couple of the province’s new public play spaces. Middle Musquoidoboit’s Nature Play Space and The Dingle Natural Playground in Halifax make the natural world more accessible to kids.

The scale and scope of these two projects are a significant development for what is still a relatively new design aesthetic in these parts. The variety of installations and the age ranges they cater to set Middle Musquoidoboit and The Dingle apart from other natural playscapes in the province. Jubilee Park in Bridgetown, continues to delight the pre-school crowd and the Evergreen organization is working with a few individual schools to incorporate natural play areas as part of the recreation mix.

Middle Musquoidoboit’s Nature Play Space will be our first stop. Playgroundology’s next blog post will share some of the fun and excitement of The Dingle playscape’s opening weekend.

steps-and-chairs

In Middle Musquoidoboit behind a thin stand of trees there’s a clearing that on opening day buzzes with feverish excitement. Kids are zigging and zagging like hummingbirds from one installation to the next – ponds, slides, a fire tower, sandpits, a nest, a bear den, a tunnel through a small hillock and a personal favourite, a vintage three-seater Flinstone-mobile (see photo gallery here).

Tucked away in one corner is a 15 foot long pit partially filled with water that’s already churned brown. The sloping sides get muddier the closer one gets to the waterline. This is the place that holds the greatest promise of transforming white t-shirts each kid was given on arrival into authentic 100% organic dirt fabric.

The mud kitchen is an eleventh hour addition to this rootsy wonderland. Middle Musquoidoboit grandmas are the driving force behind this get grimy zone. They gathered up all the equipment – pots, pans, containers, spoons, shovels, pails, cupboards and yes, the kitchen sink – to set up a deliciously fun way to create imaginary delicacies with the most versatile of ingredients, dirt, water and mud. This open air, community kitchen, where there are never too many cooks, adds a certain je ne sais quoi to the overall ambience.

Can you say Am-Phi-Bi-An? Frog and salamander prospecting is the main attraction at a kid-sized pond bursting with green along its banks. On a second trip to the Nature Play Space the Girl Power Posse, my two girls and a couple of their friends, fan out and put the multi acre playscape through its paces.

On that occasion the pond is the place to be. Getting up close and personal with frogs proves to be a heady elixir that pulls the girls back time and again to try their luck with the dipping nets.

At another popular installation, scaling tree trunk towers presents an opportunity for airborne derring-do. The ascent is tough, it’s difficult finding the right footholds and hand grips on the vertical climb. Standing at the precipice, I can only imagine the quickened pace of pounding hearts. Then the launch and a surge of adrenalin in that split second before impact.

airborne

The playscape offers numerous opportunities for kids to test and push their limits, to assess risk and challenge their physical abilities. These activities help build confidence, develop judgment and, when all goes well, can contribute to creating a reservoir of courage, resourcefulness and resilience.

This is a running, leaping, flying kind of place with wows at every turn. There are hills and rocks to climb, dirt and sand galore, small animals in their native habitat to catch and release, trees, grassy expanses and a welcome absence of motorized vehicles. This is a place to move and a place to play in the heart of Nova Scotia, Canada’s Ocean Playground.

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The Nature Play Space is a project led by the Department Of Natural Resources’ Natural Resources Education Centre. Two of the Centre’s team members, Amelia Kennedy and Sara Hill, were inspired to create a natural play space after attending an environmental educators conference with participants and presenters from throughout North America.

They left the conference with an aspirational goal that took form with considerable community engagement and sweat equity from volunteers in addition to support from their provincial government department. Two community build days, donations of labour and materials and invaluable advice were key ingredients in the success of the project. Nature aficionado, designer, trail developer and heavy equipment operator Garnet McLaughlin of Cobequid Consulting gets a huge shout out for his contributions.

So what good things are happening?

  • variety is being added to public play stock in Nova Scotia
  • communities are being engaged in the development and build processes
  • community mobilization and participation resulted in a very moderately priced playscape
  • media are covering the story
  • parents are talking about risk amongst each other and with their kids
  • a home grown design for natural playscapes has been developed that can benefit other communities
  • people are having thoughtful conversations about physical activity levels and the value of independent play
  • every kid who visits is getting a huge dose of Vitamin N

Our two visits to date resonated with excitement, laughter and an appreciation of the natural world. We’ll be regulars enjoying the leisurely drive there and back through Nova Scotia’s heartland.

For those readers who are curious about the pronunciation of Musquoidoboit click play below and listen to the GirlPower Nature Play Chorale who at the end of their song nail it.

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The Adventures of Vitamin N and The Play Rocks Kids

We encourage our kids to get daily doses of the outdoors. Whenever we can, we pack up the tent, tarp, sleeping bags, coolers, coleman stove, swimsuits, toys and then some and head out to our favourite campground in Nova Scotia’s Kejimkujik National Park – Canada’s far east.

Have you climbed a tree

Since the introduction of affordable digital cameras, I’ve snapped close to 100,000 photos. As recently as a decade ago, this volume would have been pretty much unattainable. I’m no photographer but given the high number of images, there is bound to be a few that don’t look too bad. I’ve selected some of these for this flickr collection – The Adventures of Vitamin N and The Play Rocks Kids.

VitaminN The Natural Choice

Kids, primarily my own, are the inspiration for this series which is being tweeted out as part of the Children & Nature Network campaign in support of Vitamin N. I was honoured to have been approached by the organization’s Director of Content Strategy and invited to participate in what they have dubbed the Vitamin N Challenge.

Stewards

The playful and penetrating inquisitiveness of kids comes alive in natural settings. They are awake to wonder, to life, to beauty. I like a French word that denotes a kind of heightened state – éveillé. It’s a word my partner loves to use when kids are spirited, engaged, questioning. These times with our kids remind me of my own childhood and my fascination with nature. This wonder was submerged for a few years but the family has brought it back to the surface.

We’re off to Kejimikujik again soon and I know we can count on reveling in many marvels disguised as simple pleasures.

Something happens to the temporal fabric here. There is a fluidity to the play – time continuum. Nothing empirical that I can put my finger on but I think we’ve all felt it. Our time perception behaves unexpectedly – a blurring, bending, compression and expansion.

Vitamin N keeps our guys hoppin’. Over the course of about 5 weeks the photo tweets have generated just over 30,000 impressions, a small and satisfying contribution to the overall campaign. Thanks to everyone who retweeted, liked and commented on the photos. More still to come.

Earlier this week I took five girls ranging from six to nine years-old to the largest natural playscape in Nova Scotia at the Natural Resources Education Centre in Middle Musquodoboit. I had a hard time getting the girls to leave as they were harvesting amphibians from the Frog Pond. Each of them was aglow with excitement.

Frog PondFrog Pond at the Natural Resource Education Centre’s Natural Playscape – the catch and release program was intensive…

Do you think #PlayRocks? Do you believe that kids can benefit from higher concentrations of Vitamin N? If you answer yes to one or both questions, then please share, like, tweet, or reblog this post and any of the photos in The Adventures of Vitamin N and The Play Rocks Kids flickr collection.

Even the smallest of the small are eager to explore.

In the ForestForest School, Fife, Scotland

Going, Going, Gone

I first came across Storehouse a couple of years ago and immediately fell in love with the platform’s luscious visual storytelling. The iOS app is easy to use and makes possible the creation of rich visual narratives using photo, video and text elements. Sadly Storehouse is closing down. Before it shutters for good on July 15, I invite readers to scroll through four PlayGroundology Storehouse stories that the app really helped whizz bang. Click through on images below to take you to the Storehouse stories…

Loose Parts Unplug and Play

My first Storehouse sortie captures the story of the first public play event I helped organize.

Unplug and PlayClick through to Storehouse story.

Skimming across the hay – no last straws here. In a flash the kids run over to explore. They are curious about the space, wondering…

Untitled 3Click through to Storehouse story.

Vernacular Play – Magdalen Islands

In Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawerence, a maritme play aesthetic.

Up, up and away  Click through to Storehouse story.

No text this time, the photos and video stand on their own. More though about Magdalen Island play experiences here

Steady as she goes  Click through to Storehouse story.

96 degrees in the shade – Székely

This one is subtitled ‘Playgroundin’ in tropical Paris’ and tells the story of the search for a 1950s Székely designed playground in a Paris suburb.

Székely I Click through to Storehouse story.

These are the pataugeoires – shallow, kiddy pools. One is deeper than the other and both are exquisitely detailed with carreaux cassés – broken tile mosaics now virtually a lost art. Our new playground pal Yves created carreaux cassés like this when he was a younger man.

Székely - Paddle pool detail  Click through to Storehouse story.

Quebec City’s Big Chill

There’s no place to celebrate winter fun like Quebec City’s Carnaval. Look for the cameo appearance by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau…

Carnaval IClick through to Storehouse story.

It’s no time to be still when a breath of wind drops the mercury to -39 C at Quebec City’s annual Carnaval…..

Thrills, spills – snowy saucers on sliding hills.

Sliding Click through to Storehouse story.

I’m going to miss Storehouse. I had so many more stories left to share. Thanks to the Storehouse crew for making a fun place to play….

#PlayRocks

Even a brief period of time spent watching kids engrossed in exploring the world around them, in discovering what their bodies are capable of, and just generally reveling in the independent pursuit of fun is an affirmation that, yes indeed, #PlayRocks.

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#PlayRocks is ready for the prime time social media world, ready for a little rough and tumble in the hashtag universe. Help make #PlayRocks part of the lexicon where it can join the likes of #playoutdoors, #outdoorplay, #playeveryday, #justplay and others.

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#PlayRocks can help add another voice of affirmation to play related activities, ideas and images that are being shared online at the speed of adventure. The next time you’re sharing content about the wonderful world of kids and play on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or tumblr, please consider tagging it with #PlayRocks.

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Sometimes #PlayRocks can have a very literal meaning. Rocks are like magnets to kids, their very presence a compelling attraction to climb, jump, balance.

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Help give the #PlayRocks hashtag a little push – readers are welcome to download any of the photos in this post and share them on their social media accounts.

To paraphrase a great Canadian who has penned more than a few well received tunes over the years, “keep on rockin’ in the play world……”