Category Archives: Uncategorized

One Little, Two Little, Three Canadians, We Love Thee – Who is Singing Canada’s Play People Chorus?

I pinched this ‘Four asks’ infographic from a Rethinking Childhood blog post published today by Tim Gill – it’s well worth a read. It’s brilliant that the Children’s Play Policy Forum has created a big tent for play where policy makers, researchers and practitioners from across the UK can get together to advocate and take action.

Four asks for playFour asks – for play, for health, for children, for everyone. Click to enlarge.

In the UK, non-governmental organizations – Play Scotland, Fields in Trust and London Play et al – that focus their work almost exclusively on children’s play have over the years become strong voices influencing national and local government policies. This is an important strategic difference when looking at the Canadian experience. Where is our Play Canada, Joue Québec, or Toronto Play?

It’s not that there is a lack of dedicated and fun loving Canadians who recognize and promote play. They range from educators, health care professionals, designers and landscape architects to journalists, municipal recreation leaders, parents, physical activity enthusiasts, public servants developing policy and programs and all the others who are part of the play continuum. But where are the unifying Canadian voices that focus exclusively on play and its benefits? It’s very possible that I’ve missed them and if so, I would like to get acquainted with any such groups.

Spirit of CanadaSpirit of Canada by Kyle Jackson

We Canadians wouldn’t be remiss in getting better acquainted with the best practices of other jurisdictions including the UK to see what could fly here. Never mind that, we could start sharing our own best practices related to play more broadly. In addition, a clearing house of information on children’s play research and initiatives from our various orders of government and non-governmental agencies would be a step in the right direction.

In 2017, the play world is coming to Canada’s doorstep as the City of Calgary, the International Play Association (IPA) Canada and the Alberta Parks and Recreation Association are hosting the International Play Association Conference. It will be a great opportunity for Canada to share its playbook and for Canadians to take stock of strategies that are advancing play in other parts of the world.

ConferenceInternational Play Association (IPA) Conference, City of Calgary – 2017

I just signed up with the IPA last April after meeting with the association’s President Theresa Casey. She was kind enough to take time out of her day and have a coffee with me looking out over Edinburgh’s Princes St. Gardens where on that day daffodils bobbed riotously in the wind and kids rolled down the grassy incline. What great work this IPA crowd is doing – more on them in a future installment of PlayGroundology……

DSC06497Princes St. Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland

Do read Tim Gill’s post – Politicians told: invest in play, and children, families and communities will all see the benefits – then ask yourself, what can we do in Canada? What can be done in other countries?

An open letter to ASTM, and to anyone who wants to see a thoughtful approach to playground safety

PlayGroundology:

Bubblewrapping our kids by means of incremental risk reduction is one way to approach playground safety but will it necessarily deliver the desired results? In this post’s open letter, the UK Play Safety Forum asks the American Society for Testing and Materials’ (ASTM) Sub Committee F08.63 on Playground Surfacing to reconsider and open for broader debate a planned major change to playground safety standards.

Originally posted on Rethinking Childhood:

The American standards body ASTM International is planning a major change to playground safety standards. This post (including a joint open letter to ASTM from Robin Sutcliffe – chairman of the UK Play Safety Forum – and me) is a direct plea to put this proposal on hold pending a wider review.

The proposal – to tighten up the impact absorbency thresholds for playground surfacing – may sound purely technical. In fact, it is far more profound, as my regular collaborator Bernard Spiegal has argued. What is more, it could have far-reaching consequences, potentially leading to hundreds of millions of dollars of additional expenditure by schools, municipalities and others, the removal of equipment, and widespread playground closures. Its effects could be felt far beyond the USA, given the global push to normalize product safety standards.

Despite its implications, the proposal has so far had almost no debate beyond ASTM…

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Adventure: playing out in Telford Road

PlayGroundology:

Just love this photocentric post from The Library Time Machine. Thanks for sharing these images. I’m sure PlayGroundology readers will enjoy them. Hey Canada, what do you say, don’t we need a few adventure playgrounds sprinkled across the land?

Originally posted on The Library Time Machine:

Adventure playgrounds were a feature of childhood/adolescence which passed me by really. I wasn’t brought up in London and they were mostly I think a phenomenon of urban life. I saw plenty of them when I first came to London in 1973 – brightly painted constructions of wood, behind fences, teeming with kids and I had the vague sense of having missed out on something. If you come from a small town, urban life, even the life in what might be called “deprived” areas looks exciting.

So when my colleague Tim showed me a packet of photos of the Notting Hill Adventure Playground in Telford Road that he’d retrieved in the course of an enquiry, I was fascinated by these scenes of communal play. The blogging cells in my brain immediately recognised them assomething you had to see.

NHG Adventure 011

Most of these pictures come from a large packet of photographs donated…

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Simple Treasures

There is nothing quite like stumbling across a new treasure. Sharing the find with an appreciative audience like PlayGroundology readers makes it just that much sweeter. When the kids are with me too to revel in the discovery then we’re pretty much wallowing the nirvana zone.

Play opportunities are always top of mind when we’re on the road. We frequently hear a three part harmony from the back seat of the Orlando, “can we go to a playground here?”. In Edmundston, New Brunswick we hit gold in a municipal park located next to our campground.

DSCF7486Four tires, three kids and some chains

In my five years of visiting playgrounds, scouring the interweb and receiving photos from other play enthusiasts, this was the first time I come across this particular piece of equipment, truly a simple treasure.

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In the course of 15 minutes the kids were rodeo cowboy bronco riders, firefighters scaling a ladder to fight a blazing building, aerial daredevils manoeuvring around the perimeter just a stumble away from falling into boiling lava.

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The apparatus was also well suited for balancing, sundry acrobatics and gyrations, mountaineering, gale force laughter and slowmo tag.

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Bravo to the designers for the countless hours of fun they have made possible. Kudos to the local authority for retaining this wonderful piece for the kids.

Readers, what are your favourite simple treasures from the world of play?

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Dragons and Clouds

Later today I take off for Scotland. More than 50 years ago, my mom took me on my first trip to the land where my parents played as kids. Times were tougher for them growing up. World War II set the tone for their early childhood years.

It was 1962 when Mom and I took that flight on a BOAC transatlantic plane from Toronto. Before we landed at Prestwick I got a tour of the cockpit, talked mom’s ear off, slept some and was airsick. We stayed in Grampa and Granma Morgan’s home in Larkfield, Greenock for two or three months. Mom had hopes of giving birth to her second child back home and having a wee Scot. In the end, that didn’t work out. My younger brother was born back in Canada.

Memories of those first Scottish days are still fresh. They have texture, taste and smell. I was the spoiled wee grandson while I was there and mom took me on some grand adventures notably to Glasgow for some shopping where I picked up this most excellent sword and shield….

DSC06166All dressed up with no dragons to slay

Apparently this weaponry would stand me in good stead now as my youngest daughter Lila-Jeanne informed me the other day to watch out when I was in Scotland. I asked her what I should be watching out for to which she replied, “dragons”. She got this notion from big brother Noah-David and thought it worthwhile passing on to her papa. At four-years-old, she is just a little younger than I was when I made that first trip. And the world turns.

This trip is bittersweet because earlier this year my mom passed away. I’m going with the best guy in the world and we’re carrying mom in our hearts. He’s the man I’ve always looked up to, admired and loved, the man who showed me how to make a fire with twigs, one match and plenty of puffing breath – my papa.

I’m looking forward to taking in the Play Summit conference on Sunday and experiencing my first adventure playground – Baltic Street Adventure Playground in Glasgow.

Baltic St Adventure Playground

 

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Also hope drop in on the Glasgow Museum of Modern Art to see the Atelier Public #2 exhibit curated by Katie Bruce. One of my older daughters, Halifax emerging artist Alexa Cude will enjoy getting back to GoMA, an old haunt from a couple of years back. She is joining us on this family trip too along with one of her cousins.

Also on the play beat will be a flip over to Edinburgh to meet som other fine play folk. A big thanks to Mairi for helping me to connect with people in my short window

My parents got us over to Scotland a few times when we were still young. The last time was for a few months when I was 14. Dad was in France at the time and I did quite a lot of skipping out on school. It was also my first solo trip from Greenock to Edinburgh, or more precisely Murrayfield. I saw Scotland kick France’s ass and enjoyed myself to no end in the stands.

It was a 2 train trip in each direction back and forth in one day. Great trust in a young boy of 14 – thanks mom, thanks dad. We’re doing the same for our kids. One of the three young ones has been to Scotland and experienced the wonders of the Outer Hebrides on the Isle of Scalpay. Now it’s for the tow younger girls and the eldest to get over for a visit.

Good family time, fine play people and maybe a little fish and chips and eggs and slice and other Scottish delicacies

On the day of the dragon Lila was full of Scotland. After the dragon story she looked at me and said.

“Scotland is like a cloud.”

I didn’t really see the link but went along with her and said, “Ok.”

At that point she commented:

“Then you’ll be walking on clouds.”

cloudsIn the clouds. Photo credit – Adrian Beard – thanks

Given the progression it sounded reasonable so I said:

“I guess I will.”

And then her finale.

“So you’ll be walking on air.”

Hard to refute the logic.

Tomorrow morning, Heathrow’s international air hub

Tomorrow night, fish ‘n chips, and walking on air with dragons.

Scotland here we come…

Reality TV is Venue for Playground and Community Building with Tomorrow’s Leaders

Local governments and communities in Ontario, Canada have an opportunity to improve on and build new public play spaces through a kid fueled reality TV show. GIVER is now queuing up for its third season. Co-produced by Sinking Ship Entertainment – makers of the smash hit Dino Dan and other critically acclaimed children’s titles – this show is hands on design, community engagement, team building and leadership development.

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TVO, Ontario’s public broadcaster, is airing simple, authentic community stories that demonstrate what kids are capable of accomplishing given the opportunity. Each episode ends with the celebration of new play opportunities. It’s a format that’s worked well the first two seasons and resulted in some industry recognition.

AWARDS
2013 Youth Media Alliance Awards of Excellence
• Winner – “Best Television Program, All Genres, Ages 6-8″: Giver
• Nomination – “Best Convergent Website”: Giver-tv.com

PlayGroundology first checked in on GIVER as it was getting out of the gates in season one. Now that the show is established, we’re hoping there will be an expansion beyond Ontario and into other provinces perhaps even other countries.

In the meantime, we’re happy to help producer Kristen McGregor spread the word. Applications/Calls for Submissions for interested Ontario communities close on March 1. Don’t miss the boat!

Season two of GIVER begins airing April 30 on TVO.

The Kids Are Alright

The kids are alright, well actually these ones are quite spectacular. On opposite sides of the Atlantic this week media are reporting on stories of two groups of youth helping to make their communities better places.

In Halifax, capital of Canada’s Ocean Playground, Hope Blooms, a community social enterprise walked away with a significant investment following their pitch on a nationally broadcast TV show, Dragon’s Den.

The Hope Blooms line of salad dressing made from what they plant and harvest in community gardens is a hot seller. The six Hope Blooms members who pitched the five dragons on the show in Toronto were able to raise airfare to get there in short order. That’s because they are well known, loved and supported by the larger North End Halifax community.

They went to the show, which aired last night, with a $10,000 ask promising 5% royalties until the loan was paid back. They walked away with $40,0000, no strings attached and promises of promotion and product placement by the four dragons who came forward to support their venture.

The story resonated far and wide in Halifax where it was a topic of conversation throughout the day around the city. It struck a chord with the dragons too (Hope Blooms segment of the show available here – may not be accessible in all countries) and was part of the CBC’s national news broadcast yesterday evening. A great story of community, commitment, passion and engagement. Hats off to the youth of Hope Blooms and may their ideas and hard work continue to bear fruit.

Over in the UK in London’s East End, a group of primary kids in Hackney is raising funds for a school playground. Three years ago the school raised funds to help build a playground in Kenya. Now it’s their own Millfields Community School that is in need.

The kids have banded together along with some professional musicians to record a song penned by a community member and former teacher, Johnathan Hart. A digital download of Christmas is £0.99 and 20% of sales will be donated to UNICEF.

More on the Hackney kids in this story from East London Lines. If you want to hear some sweet voices and help their cause, click through here.

Inspiring stories showing what young people can accomplish in the name of community.