on the waterfront – kids just wanna have fun

where sea meets city is not always a pretty sight – docklands, railyards, industry and in the worst cases some nasty effluents too. it’s cause for celebration when local governments get it right and reclaim urban seafronts for the public with a mash-up of recreational, residential and business opportunities.

residents and visitors to halifax have plenty to enjoy on a 1.5 kilometre boardwalk skirting the downtown core and the shoreline of the world’s largest, ice-free natural harbour. the space is a magnet for special events ranging from tall ships and beach volleyball tourneys to buskers and the night time art extravaganza, nocturne.

it’s also a place where fun and play abound as the kids showed us this weekend. the last thing we expected to come across was a bubble machine. but there it was manufacturing magical bursts of shimmery shapes (click for larger images).

 

 

all hail the bubble maker

 

 

closing in

 

 

bubbalacious

 

 

bubble poppin’ finale

 

 

for kids, the grown-up rest stops are quickly transformed into swing buzzes and obstacle courses…

 

hanging high

 

 

p is for pivot

 

 

stretching and hiding

 

 

then there is art as affordance, an irresistible invitation to skitter up to the crest of the wave sculpture and then slide down to the base…

 

cresting the wave

 

 

a hop, skip and a jump from the wave is halifax’s own orange sub complete with conning tower, escape slide, a jules verne see through nose and springrider whales flanking its seaward side.

 

we all play in an orange submarine

 

 

the sub is no longer quite as shiny as it appears in this photo from a few years ago but it continues to be a waterfront favourite with the kids. thanks to develop nova scotia as well as the municipal, provincial and federal governments for working together to make the land meets sea zone a kid friendly place with playable spaces.

what’s happening on your waterfront?

 

Kids and Freedom – Tim Gill’s HuffPost 9 Plus 3 from PlayGroundology

Great list from Tim Gill on giving kids more freedom in a recent edition of UK Huff Post. Each of the 9 items listed in the article will help kids blaze a trail to greater freedom. Together they are a powerful recipe for fun, discovery and stretching limits.

I’m supplementing Tim’s list with 3 additions of my own (10 through 12) to make it an even dozen. Send PlayGroundology a comment if you have items to add to the list.

10. Create opportunities for your kids to explore and play in the natural world. If you have green spaces close to where you live, set the children free to explore. If not, take them to a park, a ravine, to the woods, the seashore – many opportunities for play will present themselves and the benefits of spending time in nature are well documented. Do caution about potential hazards.

Because They Want to Live in Nature

11. Make your home a play zone. I’m not talking anything grandiose here, no large infusions of cash for play installations or play houses and such. Get a few loose parts – milk crates, tires, inner tubes, tarps, ropes, cardboard boxes, a few planks of lumber and let the kids have at it in the backyard. There are hours of self-directed play and discovery with this kind of material and your yard will become a very popular destination. No backyard? Get a small group of parents together and explore what’s possible on lands managed by your local authority.

In Kids We Trust

12. Listen. Listen to your kids about what they would like to do. They have great play ideas. Make the space and time to embrace some of them and enable them to happen. Listen to yourself, remember the play adventures you had as a child – savour, share with your own kids…

Fort Summer

Support play, independence and resilience – get the kids outdoors to explore and have fun.

 

Open House – Pop-Up Neighbourhood

This is a big shout out to the Pop-Up Adventure Play crew – Zan, Morgan and Andy. One year ago, they touched down in Halifax to kick off a very successful cross-Canada summer tour.

Click here, or on image for photo story.

Kids and adults alike had a great time creating and destroying over the course of nearly three hours on a sun washed summer afternoon. Check out some highlights in the photo story by clicking through above.

If you are intrigued by pop-up play and loose parts, then maybe Pop-Up Adventure Play’s next Campference in Houston, Texas is for you – details here.

Survey says – CityLab is looking for our help

Ok, actually CityLab is looking for a few minutes of your time, your opinions and insights. Thanks to Canada’s Mariana Brussoni for sharing news about this CityLab survey yesterday. The good people at CityLab are part of the Atlantic Media family. In short, their mission is to “focus on five areas of urban coverage—design, transportation, environment, equity, and life—as well as a new Solutions hub to collect the best ideas and stories for an urbanizing world.”

From Jessica Leigh Hester’s CityLab article – Science to Parents – Let Your Kids Run a Little Wild. Photo credit – Andrea Slatter/Shutterstock.com

The survey is a component of Room to Grow, a new series on raising small children in cities around the globe. In the survey’s intro (full text below), CityLab editor, Molly McCluskey, extends an invitation to parents to get involved: “If you’re a parent with opinions about how your region supports young kids and their caregivers, help inform our reporting by taking a few moments to complete the survey.”

Click through here or on the image above to go to the online survey

I completed the survey last night in just over 15 minutes. This is a great outreach and research tool that CityLab is developing. It’s a strategy that could benefit other publications looking for a broad range of input. Kudos to Atlantic Media for adopting this approach.

Here are a few sample questions that will whet your appetite.

Do you feel safe letting your child play outside in your city?
Yes
No
Other:

 

What has your city done to shape your feelings on this issue?

 

What are some of the biggest challenges in raising young children in your town/city?

 

How and where do you find community and support as a parent in your city?

 

Don’t delay, click here and complete your survey today. By doing so, you will help provide a foundation for more informed and relevant reporting on kids in the urban world from the good folks at CityLab.

Reporting like this –

From Mimi Kirk’s CityLab article Can We Bring Back Riskier Playgrounds? Photo credit – Lady Allen of Hurtwood Archives, Coventry, U.K.

Take a few minutes and share your thoughts. We will all benefit from more insightful stories that put children first.

Bouquets for play reporting in The Guardian

Hi Ashifa,

Hope you’re well today. I want you to know that The Guardian is one of my favourite publications. I’ll be renewing my annual subscription when it comes up in November. Also I am thrilled that the paper has deemed Canada of sufficient interest that we have a Canadian correspondent – you.

As you’ve discovered, we have news and stories galore to share with your readership around the world. Today I just read your piece on the west coast play brouhaha that was posted on the 12th – Canadian neighbourhood declares ‘war on fun’ with ban on outdoor play.

I understand why these stories are hard to resist. They make great copy. Indignant, or incredulous readers (myself included) can tsk, tsk, or titter, titter at decisions that have lost touch with common sense and situations that seem to emanate from some bizarro 5th dimension. As one twitter friend opined about this story – ‘stop the insanity’.

These narratives from the margins surface every now and then in countries around the world. It’s hard to be sympathetic to the protagonists of such ill conceived incursions into kids’ play.  Their actions seem to indicate a certain detachment from reality.

How about the Toronto principal a few years back that banned bringing balls to school… Or, what about those schools that had a no contact policy? Kids were not allowed to touch each other at recess or throughout the day. Put a crimp on a lot of outdoor games!

In Nova Scotia earlier this month, there was public outcry because many new primary students will not be able to play on schoolyard playgrounds when they enter school for the first time in September. Due to a change in government policy kids are entering a year earlier. The fixed playground equipment is rated for ages 5 through 12. During the school day, kids younger than that are persona non grate.

Invariably the arguments put forward purport a safety link of some sort and a desire to reduce risk and danger. More often than not they are a handy excuse to trot out and achieve stated objectives – no road play, no play on equipment that is not age appropriate, no play in undesignated play spaces, etc.

The Artisan Gardens story on Vancouver Island has gone the rounds – Global News, CBC, CTV, Times Colonist, BBC and The Guardian. Each of these stories would have been stronger had there been some mention of play’s changing dynamics in Canada. It would have raised the bar from good copy about a quirky subject to helping create greater awareness of the bigger picture.

Builders and designers, municipal leaders and recreation planners, educators and researchers are coming to similar evidence-based conclusions. Risk and resilience are closely linked and this understanding is helping to lead a renaissance of play.

Today we visited Kentville on Canada’s east coast. There was a festival where roads in the community’s downtown were cordoned off so kids and adults could chalk the streets. This is an example – and there are many more – of some of the great things that are happening in Canadian communities.

Source: Town of Wolfville Facebook Page

It’s encouraging when assignment editors dispatch reporters to get stories on play, or when reporters themselves pitch these stories to their editors. If these ‘gotcha, good copy’ stories could provide just a little more context on some of the exciting developments taking place across the country like Calgary’s itinerant loose parts, Coquitlam’s new adventure playground, the proliferation of natural playgrounds, or the important work being supported by The Lawson Foundation… Well us play people would be jumping for joy.

Oakdene Park, Kentville, Nova Scotia

Ashifa – if you ever make it down our way to Nova Scotia, Canada’s Ocean Playground, give us a shout and we’ll be happy to introduce you to some great play stories.

Speaking of which here are some more fine stories from The Guardian on play.

Look – Don’t Play

Something has gone terribly awry in Canada’s Ocean Playground. This September, many of the kids entering school for the first time in Nova Scotia will apparently be persona non grata on school playgrounds.

This sorry state of affairs is an unintended result of s recent policy shift. A combined safety standards and insurance SNAFU was discovered last fall. That’s the first time that kids having their fourth birthday on or before December 31 were able to start school as part a new provincial pre-primary program.

The pre-primary cohort is weighted to three and four-year-olds. That’s the nub of the problem. Off the shelf playground equipment installed in numerous schoolyards is labeled and recommended for use by kids in the five to twelve-year-old age range.

The School Insurance Program (SIP) has not recommended the use of this equipment for kids under the age of five. The institutional response from the provincial department responsible for education and from individual school districts upholds the SIP recommendation while emphasizing that SIP covers all primary school students regardless of age.

And so it goes…. none of the kids starting out in the pre-primary program will be able to play on school sanctioned playground equipment until they are in primary unless the equipment is deemed to be age appropriate.

Parents are not impressed with what is perceived as a rigid example of risk aversion as shared by PlayGroundology FB friend, Nicole Wulff:

…this just happened at our elementary school. The special ed 3-5 yo are no longer allowed on the kindergarten playground…the kids who need the most exposure to opps to improve fine and gross motor…..

 

Let’s remember that these school playgrounds are open to the public after hours and kids can play on the equipment as they choose regardless of age. This post limits itself to commenting on the play structures. It does not touch on the debate linked to early school enrollment.

There is a general recognition in all of this that playgrounds only represent one facet of engaging kids in play. Parents, educators as well as school and government officials all agree about the value and importance of play. In an ironic twist, the pre-primary program is heavily weighted to play-based learning.

 

This presents a great opportunity to introduce other forms of play into the equation. A favourite of mine that continues to gain steam around the world is ‘loose parts play’. It’s a great fit for pre-primary. I have led loose parts play events with kids ranging in age from three to twelve-years-old. It’s always been a great success. Many of the after school Excel programs throughout Halifax adopted loose parts play following a presentation on risk and play by the UK’s Tim Gill three years ago.

Resources on loose parts here and its impacts in an Australian public school setting here.

Loose Parts Play – Halifax Commons, 2017 – Read more here

This ‘look – don’t play’ SNAFU has been covered by local media including CBC, Global, CTV, The Star – Halifax and Halifax Today. It’s great seeing resources allocated to these kind of stories.

Across the country, developments led by designers, builders, parents, municipal governments, academics and recreation leaders are seeing a shift away from the old risk averse models of play to a context where risk and resilience are perceived as key elements in the renaissance of independent, outdoor play.

As the pre-primary program undergoes a major expansion in Nova Scotia this fall, let’s just make sure our smalls get plenty of play opportunities in the school environment. Loose parts play is doable from a budget, training and implementation perspective. What an opportunity…

Some Canadiana Play on Canada Day

Happy Canada Day

Hope you enjoy this slice of Play Canadiana as we celebrate our birthday from coast to coast to coast. Excerpted and abridged from CanadaPlays.

National Treasures

First up, let’s share a couple of national treasures with you. From her home in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia on Canada’s east coast, Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam creates aerial textile play environments that are a riot of movement and pulsating colours.

Prior to dedicating her artistic vision to designing an unparalleled play experience for kids, Toshiko exhibited her textile art at prominent galleries and museums in Japan, the US and Europe. At one point, she questioned whether there was more to life than prepping for shows and hosting vernissages.

A few years ago, my then four-year-old daughter Nellie-Rose accompanied me on the first PlayGroundology road trip. We had lunch with Toshiko and her partner Charles in their home and learned how her wondrous woven webs of play are the creative fabric that warms her life.

Inside, Upside – Harmonic Motion, Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam installation at Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma, 2013. Credit – Roberto Boccaccino

As Toshiko transitioned away from the art exhibition world, she spent weekends over the course of three years walking around neighbourhoods in her native Japan. This research and exploration of the where, what and how of kids’ play convinced her that there was an opportunity to introduce some new concepts rooted in textile sculpture.

Toshiko’s play sculptures are found in prominent locations in Japan, including the Hakone Open-Air Museum, and a variety of Asian countries. The large scale sculptures have yet make any real headway in North America or Europe outside of exhibit spaces.

Toshiko works with Norihide Imagawa, one of Japan’s foremost structural designers and engineers to ensure maximum integrity and safety of each of her play sculptures. Photos of her play sculptures have created a couple of online surges of interest in her work from the design, architecture and play communities. Let’s hope that kids in more communities around the world will have the opportunity to revel in unbridled play in one of Toshiko’s lovingly crafted creations…

Outside, Flipside – Harmonic Motion, Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam installation at Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma, 2013. Credit – Roberto Boccaccino

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander has had children at heart all her life. She first designed public housing playgrounds in the US in the 1950s with architects Louis Kahn and Oskar Stonorov. This was shortly after being amongst the first women to graduate from Harvard as a landscape architect and prior to moving to her adopted home, in British Columbia, Canada.

In 1967, as part of Canada’s centennial celebrations, Cornelia was invited to design the playground at the Children’s Creative Centre as part of the Canadian pavilion at Expo 67. Mr. PlayGroundology was 10 at the time but sadly our family never made the trip from Toronto to Montreal for the party of parties marking our 100th birthday though I remember a lot of fun from that summer nonetheless. By all accounts the kids who were able to give the Expo 67 playscape a whirl liked it a lot.

This clip is excerpted from the National Film Board of Canada documentary, The Canadian Pavilion, Expo 67. Following Expo, Cornelia participated in the creation of national playground guidelines and designed more than 70 across the country. A few years back, she was kind enough to speak with me on the phone thanks to an introduction from the folks at space2place.

Expo 67 Creative Children’s Centre. Source: Canadian Centre for Architecture

Aside from sharing a wonderful bibliography with me, I remember how she emphasized simplicity remarking, and I’m paraphrasing here, that to have fun all kids really need is sand, water and something to climb… Thank you Cornelia for all your contributions not only to play in Canada but to the greening of our urban landscapes.

Players

There are an increasing number of organizations across the country who contribute to promoting, programming and researching about play. In no particular order here is a partial list that provides a sampling of some of the activity underway in Canada: Le lion et la souris (Montréal, QC); Active Kids Club (Toronto, ON); Integrate Play Solutions (BC); outsideplay.ca (British Columbia); Active for Life (QC); Centre for Local Research into Public Space (CELOS) and Dufferin Grove Park (Toronto, ON); Calgary Playground Review (Calgary, AB); Manitoba Nature Summit (Winnipeg, MB); The Lawson Foundation (Toronto, ON); Mariana Brussoni – UBC (Vancouver, BC); ParticipACTION (Toronto, ON); Playground Builders (Whistler, BC); CanadaPlays (Eastern Passage, NS)  And let’s not forget a shout to all those whose work supports play in their roles with municipal, provincial and federal governments and service organizations.

Playmakers – Designers and Builders

This a small selection of Canadian companies creating custom playscapes.

Earthscape

Carcross Commons – Tagish First Nation, Carcross, Yukon

Earthscape has developed a substantial catalogue of custom design and build playscapes that have been installed throughout the country. Each Earthscape project is unique. I’m thrilled that Halifax gave an Earthscape project the green light in 2016. The company is now exporting and has installed a super slide on New York City’s Governors Island.

Mouna Andraos and Melissa Mongiat – Daily tous les jours

A sensation in Montreal since the original 21 balançoires were introduced in the Quartier des spectacles in 2011. Every day each swing swung an average of 8,500 times. An adaptation of the original installation has been touring North American cities. A musical swings impact study is available here.

space2place

Completed in 2008, space2place’s Garden City Play Environment in Richmond, British Columbia was ahead of the curve in the context of Canadian fixed structure playgrounds. There is a great write up of this space published in The Vancouver Sun shortly after its opening.

Bienenstock

McCleary Playground downtown Toronto – 2008

Adam Bienenstock was at the front end of the natural playground surge and continues to bring his personal brand and vision to schools, communities and settings in the natural environment in Canada and beyond.

Cobequid Consulting

Nature aficionado, designer, trail developer and heavy equipment operator Garnet McLaughlin of Cobequid Consulting had a big role to play in the design and build of Nova Scotia’s Natural Resources Education Centre – Nature Play Space in Middle Musquodoboit. If you’re visiting Canada’s Ocean Playground, this is a must stop if you’re traveling with kids…

Children’s Rights

In Montreal’s Salamander Playground atop Mount Royal Park, Québecois artist Gérard Dansereau has created a series of original tiles embedded throughout the play area to commemorate and draw attention to the Conventions on the Rights of the Child as elaborated and promoted by UNICEF. I have added the English to my favourite tile from the series below. Other tiles available to view here.

From tiles designed by Québecois artist Gérard Dansereau

The Poutine of Play

Poutine has gone from a well-loved, known locally only Québec delicacy to an international phenomenon. Could it be that ballon-poire will travel a similar trajectory exporting a culturally branded Québecois game around the globe? I’ve seen the game played just once and even though I have no understanding of the rules, it attracted me immediately. It is easy to see that eye – hand coordination is certainly de rigueur. The girls in the clip below are spelling out a word but I didn’t stay long enough to capture it all. There are a number of variations to the game accompanied to different call and answers as the players whump the punch bag back and forth as quickly as they can. I’m looking forward to gaining a better understanding of how the game is played some day and hopefully giving it a whirl myself.

What is your favourite Canadiana play?

Do you have a favourite play place, a memory a photo, your own piece of Canadiana, a fvourited builder, designer, player, national treasure? Leave a comment here or drop us a line on PlayGroundology Facebook, or Twitter.

Original artwork by Kyle Jackson now hanging at Alderney Landing Library in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia